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Jamestown S'Klallam Tribal Library: Collections ~ q̕pə́ŋ

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Our collection specializes in Native American authors and topics, both historical and contemporary, with a focus on the Pacific Northwest. Click the link to the right to search the Library's collections of books, audio books, DVDs, CDs, magazines, and documents. You can also use this link to log into your library account. (Contact us if you need assistance with log-in.)

 

Native Authors

Special Collections

For Book Lovers!

New Items!

You're Doing What?

In this book, you'll see women of different races, classes, and sexual orientations face various challenges and choices as they age. A loving daughter recounts how her mother moved beyond a "bare and unadorned" Mississippi upbringing. A California Chicana counters her mother's denial of her Mexican heritage. A bisexual polyamorist rejects a life like her mother's. There are (relatively) young elders - the writer/teacher/poet grappling with her legacy - and older ones - the nonagenarian New Englander investing (monetarily) in the future. And there are women who refuse to succumb to disabilities - like the retired history professor, with rheumatoid arthritis, now writing poetry. All are embracing new adventures and changing what it means to be an "older woman."

S'Klallam Tribal Elder Sherry Lou Macgregor contributes On a Journey in a Canoe.

Hearts Unbroken

New York Times best-selling author Cynthia Leitich Smith turns to realistic fiction with the thoughtful story of a Native teen navigating the complicated, confusing waters of high school -- and first love. When Louise Wolfe's first real boyfriend mocks and disrespects Native people in front of her, she breaks things off and dumps him over e-mail. It's her senior year, anyway, and she'd rather spend her time with her family and friends and working on the school newspaper. The editors pair her up with Joey Kairouz, the ambitious new photojournalist, and in no time the paper's staff find themselves with a major story to cover: the school musical director's inclusive approach to casting The Wizard of Oz has been provoking backlash in their mostly white, middle-class Kansas town. From the newly formed Parents Against Revisionist Theater to anonymous threats, long-held prejudices are being laid bare and hostilities are spreading against teachers, parents, and students -- especially the cast members at the center of the controversy, including Lou's little brother, who's playing the Tin Man. As tensions mount at school, so does a romance between Lou and Joey -- but as she's learned, "dating while Native" can be difficult. In trying to protect her own heart, will Lou break Joey's?

There There

"This is a novel about what it means to inhabit a land both yours and stolen from you, to simultaneously contend with the weight of belonging and unbelonging. There is an organic power to this book--a revelatory, controlled chaos. Tommy Orange writes the way a storm makes landfall." --Omar El Akkad, author of American War   Tommy Orange's "groundbreaking, extraordinary" (The New York Times) There There is the "brilliant, propulsive" (People Magazine) story of twelve unforgettable characters, Urban Indians living in Oakland, California, who converge and collide on one fateful day. It's "the year's most galvanizing debut novel" (Entertainment Weekly).   As we learn the reasons that each person is attending the Big Oakland Powwow--some generous, some fearful, some joyful, some violent--momentum builds toward a shocking yet inevitable conclusion that changes everything. Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life back together after his uncle's death and has come to work at the powwow to honor his uncle's memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and will to perform in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and loss.   

In the Light of Justice

In 2007 the United Nations approved the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. United States endorsement in 2010 ushered in a new era of Indian law and policy. This book highlights steps that the United States, as well as other nations, must take to provide a more just society and heal past injustices committed against indigenous peoples.

The Inuksuk Book

An inuksuk is a stone structure that can communicate knowledge essential for survival to an Arctic traveler. Inuksuit are found throughout the Arctic areas of Alaska, Arctic Canada, and Greenland. Mary Wallace, in consultation with Inuit elders and other noted experts, gives a fascinating introduction in words, pictures, and paintings to the many forms of the inuksuk structure and its unique place in Inuit life and culture. Inuksuit take on many forms, the most recognized being the inunnguaq ('like a person'), which is built in the shape of a human. Mary Wallace explains ten of the major types of inuksuit, while archival photographs and exquisite silk paintings bring these shapes to life. In telling the story of inuksuit, the story of those who dwell in the Arctic unfolds. A guide to Inuktitut words rounds out this comprehensive guide to the inuksuk.

eBooks--how to get free ones

Featured DVD

Indigeneous Films

Contact Us!

Call us: 360-681-4632
Email us: library@jamestowntribe.org
Physical Address:

1070 Old Blyn Hwy
Sequim, WA 98382

Mailing Address:

1033 Old Blyn Hwy
Sequim, WA 98382

Information ~ ʔuč

Physical Address:
1070 Old Blyn Hwy, Sequim, WA

Mailing Address:
1033 Old Blyn Hwy, Sequim, WA  98382

Phone: 360-681-4632

Email:  library@jamestowntribe.org

Website: library.jamestowntribe.org

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